Details zur Publikation

Referenztyp Zeitschriften
DOI / URL Link
Titel (primär) Ventricular bigeminy following a cobra envenomation
Autor Ismail, A.K.; Weinstein, S.A.; Auliya, M.; Appareo, P.;
Journal / Serie Clinical Toxicology
Erscheinungsjahr 2012
Department NSF;
Band/Volume 50
Heft 6
Sprache englisch;
Keywords arrhythmia, cardiotoxicity, envenomation, emergency, Naja sp., snakebite; arrhythmia; cardiotoxicity; envenomation; emergency; Naja sp.;snakebite
Abstract

Envenoming by some species of cobras (Naja species) may include cardiotoxic effects including various dysrhythmias. However, dysrhythmias leading specifically to ventricular bigeminy have not been previously documented. We report a case of cardiotoxicity and the development of ventricular bigeminy following a cobra envenomation. Case details. The patient was a 23-year-old man who presented to an emergency department following an alleged cobra bite. There was transient episode of nausea, vomiting, hypotension and tachycardia. The ECG showed infrequent ventricular ectopics that progressed to ventricular bigeminy and persisted even after the vital signs normalized. Complete resolution and resumption of normal sinus rhythm occurred following an empirical administration of monovalent antivenom against Naja kaouthia venom. The patient was discharged after 24 hours of uneventful observation. Discussion. The patient's concomitant local effects, episodic cardiovascular instability and evolution of ventricular bigeminy support the likelihood of a venom-induced disease. Ventricular bigeminy can develop following a cobra envenomation. Thorough clinical evaluation, close serial observation of vital signs and early continuous cardiac monitoring are important in Naja spp. bites.


Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/15563650.2012.696119

Envenoming by some species of cobras (Naja species) may include cardiotoxic effects including various dysrhythmias. However, dysrhythmias leading specifically to ventricular bigeminy have not been previously documented. We report a case of cardiotoxicity and the development of ventricular bigeminy following a cobra envenomation. Case details. The patient was a 23-year-old man who presented to an emergency department following an alleged cobra bite. There was transient episode of nausea, vomiting, hypotension and tachycardia. The ECG showed infrequent ventricular ectopics that progressed to ventricular bigeminy and persisted even after the vital signs normalized. Complete resolution and resumption of normal sinus rhythm occurred following an empirical administration of monovalent antivenom against Naja kaouthia venom. The patient was discharged after 24 hours of uneventful observation. Discussion. The patient's concomitant local effects, episodic cardiovascular instability and evolution of ventricular bigeminy support the likelihood of a venom-induced disease. Ventricular bigeminy can develop following a cobra envenomation. Thorough clinical evaluation, close serial observation of vital signs and early continuous cardiac monitoring are important in Naja spp. bites.


Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/15563650.2012.696119

Envenoming by some species of cobras (Naja species) may include cardiotoxic effects including various dysrhythmias. However, dysrhythmias leading specifically to ventricular bigeminy have not been previously documented. We report a case of cardiotoxicity and the development of ventricular bigeminy following a cobra envenomation. Case details. The patient was a 23-year-old man who presented to an emergency department following an alleged cobra bite. There was transient episode of nausea, vomiting, hypotension and tachycardia. The ECG showed infrequent ventricular ectopics that progressed to ventricular bigeminy and persisted even after the vital signs normalized. Complete resolution and resumption of normal sinus rhythm occurred following an empirical administration of monovalent antivenom against Naja kaouthia venom. The patient was discharged after 24 hours of uneventful observation. Discussion. The patient's concomitant local effects, episodic cardiovascular instability and evolution of ventricular bigeminy support the likelihood of a venom-induced disease. Ventricular bigeminy can develop following a cobra envenomation. Thorough clinical evaluation, close serial observation of vital signs and early continuous cardiac monitoring are important in Naja spp. bites.


Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/15563650.2012.696119

by some species of cobras (Naja species) may include cardiotoxic effects including various dysrhythmias. However, dysrhythmias leading specifically to ventricular bigeminy have not been previously documented. We report a case of cardiotoxicity and the development of ventricular bigeminy following a cobra envenomation. Case details. The patient was a 23-year-old man who presented to an emergency department following an alleged cobra bite. There was transient episode of nausea, vomiting, hypotension and tachycardia. The ECG showed infrequent ventricular ectopics that progressed to ventricular bigeminy and persisted even after the vital signs normalized. Complete resolution and resumption of normal sinus rhythm occurred following an empirical administration of monovalent antivenom against Naja kaouthia venom. The patient was discharged after 24 hours of uneventful observation. Discussion. The patient's concomitant local effects, episodic cardiovascular instability and evolution of ventricular bigeminy support the likelihood of a venom-induced disease. Ventricular bigeminy can develop following a cobra envenomation. Thorough clinical evaluation, close serial observation of vital signs and early continuous cardiac monitoring are important in Naja spp. bites.


Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/15563650.2012.696119

Envenoming by some species of cobras (Naja species) may include cardiotoxic effects including various dysrhythmias. However, dysrhythmias leading specifically to ventricular bigeminy have not been previously documented. We report a case of cardiotoxicity and the development of ventricular bigeminy following a cobra envenomation. Case details. The patient was a 23-year-old man who presented to an emergency department following an alleged cobra bite. There was transient episode of nausea, vomiting, hypotension and tachycardia. The ECG showed infrequent ventricular ectopics that progressed to ventricular bigeminy and persisted even after the vital signs normalized. Complete resolution and resumption of normal sinus rhythm occurred following an empirical administration of monovalent antivenom against Naja kaouthia venom. The patient was discharged after 24 hours of uneventful observation. Discussion. The patient's concomitant local effects, episodic cardiovascular instability and evolution of ventricular bigeminy support the likelihood of a venom-induced disease. Ventricular bigeminy can develop following a cobra envenomation. Thorough clinical evaluation, close serial observation of vital signs and early continuous cardiac monitoring are important in Naja spp. bites.

ID 12648
dauerhafte UFZ-Verlinkung https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=12648
Ismail, A.K., Weinstein, S.A., Auliya, M., Appareo, P. (2012):
Ventricular bigeminy following a cobra envenomation
Clin. Toxicol. 50 (6), 518 - 521