Publication Details

Category Text Publication
Reference Category Book chapters
Title (Primary) Giant otters in the Peruvian rainforest: linking protected area conditions to species needs
Title (Secondary) Landscape ecology and resource management: linking theory with practice
Author Schenck, C.; Groenendijk, J.; Hajek, F.; Staib, E.; Frank, K.
Publisher Bissonette, J.A.; Storch, I.
Year 2003
Department OESA
Page From 341
Page To 357
Abstract A long-term study (1990-96) was conducted in Manu National Park to investigate the status, habitat, behaviour and conservation of giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis) in Peru. Results showed that compared to other carnivores, family groups of giant otters use exceptionally small territories. Still, the population density remains surprisingly low (approximately 75 animals in the 15‚ÄČ300 km2 national park). Based on the behavioural studies, an individual-based simulation model was developed. The model indicated that the number of family groups and the number of dispersing, sexually mature subadults were the two factors most critical for long-term persistence of the Manu population. In the model, The probability that two potential partners will meet in a vacant territory was calculated. The greater the number of animals in the population, the sooner a vacant territory became occupied. Below a critical population size, however, the probability of colonization dropped significantly. The modelling results demonstrated that small-scale events that reduced the numbers of dispersing otter may result in a large-scale decline of the entire population. The results also indicate that the giant otter population in Manu National Park, one of the largest protected areas worldwide, is isolated and not large enough itself to be considered viable in the long-term.
Persistent UFZ Identifier https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=5965
Schenck, C., Groenendijk, J., Hajek, F., Staib, E., Frank, K. (2003):
Giant otters in the Peruvian rainforest: linking protected area conditions to species needs
In: Bissonette, J.A., Storch, I. (eds.)
Landscape ecology and resource management: linking theory with practice
Island Press, Washington, DC, p. 341 - 357