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Title (Primary) The two odors of iron when touched or pickled: (skin) carbonyl compounds and organophosphines
Author Glindemann, D.; Dietrich, A.; Stärk, H.-J.; Kuschk, P.;
Journal Angewandte Chemie-International Edition
Year 2006
Department UBT; ANA; SANA;
Volume 45
Issue 42
Language englisch;
Keywords aldehydes; iron; ketones; peroxides; phosphines
Abstract

 

The smell of money and chemical weapons: The perplexing metallic odor from touching iron tools or coins (see picture) is a type of human body odor linked to the decomposition of skin peroxides. Fe2+ ion containing rust, drinking water, and blood all cause a similar metallic odor. Another “garlic” metallic odor, that of phosphorus-alloyed iron under acid attack, is caused by organophosphines, including C–P compounds which are monitored under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

ID 2640
Persistent UFZ Identifier https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=2640
Glindemann, D., Dietrich, A., Stärk, H.-J., Kuschk, P. (2006):
The two odors of iron when touched or pickled: (skin) carbonyl compounds and organophosphines
Angew. Chem.-Int. Edit. 45 (42), 7006 - 7009