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Title (Primary) Regional asymmetry in the response of global vegetation growth to springtime compound climate events
Author Li, J.; Bevacqua, E.; Chen, C.; Wang, Z.; Chen, X.; Myneni, R.B.; Wu, X.; Xu, C.-Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zscheischler, J.
Journal Communications Earth & Environment
Year 2022
Department CHS
Volume 3
Page From art. 123
Language englisch
Topic T5 Future Landscapes
Data links https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.19558675.v1
Supplements https://static-content.springer.com/esm/art%3A10.1038%2Fs43247-022-00455-0/MediaObjects/43247_2022_455_MOESM1_ESM.pdf
Abstract Compound climate events can strongly impact vegetation productivity, yet the direct and lagged vegetation productivity responses to seasonal compound warm-dry and cold-dry events remain unclear. Here we use observationally-constrained and process-based model data and analyze vegetation productivity responses to compound events of precipitation and temperature in spring and summer across global mid-to-high latitudes. We find regional asymmetries in direct and lagged effects of compound warm-dry events. In high-latitudes (>50°N), compound warm-dry events raise productivity. In contrast, in mid-latitudes (23.5–50°N/S), compound warm-dry events reduce productivity and compound warm-dry springs can cause and amplify summer droughts, thereby reducing summer productivity. Compound cold-dry events impose direct and lagged adverse impacts on productivity in mid-to-high latitudes, exceeding the impacts from individual cold and dry events. Our results highlight the benefits of a multivariate perspective on vegetation vulnerability as precipitation and temperature often covary and jointly drive vegetation impacts.
Persistent UFZ Identifier https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=26165
Li, J., Bevacqua, E., Chen, C., Wang, Z., Chen, X., Myneni, R.B., Wu, X., Xu, C.-Y., Zhang, Z., Zscheischler, J. (2022):
Regional asymmetry in the response of global vegetation growth to springtime compound climate events
Commun. Earth Environ. 3 , art. 123