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Title (Primary) Emission of CO2 and CH4 from 13 deadwood tree species is linked to tree species identity and management intensity in forest and grassland habitats
Author Kipping, L.; Gossner, M.M.; Koschorreck, M.; Muszynski, S.; Maurer, F.; Weiser, W.; Jehmlich, N.; Noll, M.
Journal Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Year 2022
Department SEEFO; MOLSYB
Volume 36
Issue 5
Page From e2021GB007143
Language englisch
Topic T5 Future Landscapes
Supplements https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/action/downloadSupplement?doi=10.1029%2F2021GB007143&file=2021GB007143-sup-0001-Supporting+Information+SI-S01.pdf
Keywords deadwood decay; emission rates (CO2, CH4); climate variables; management intensity; early stages of decay
Abstract Deadwood is an important component of the global carbon cycle, and its decomposition releases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) into the atmosphere. However, the main drivers of these greenhouse gas emissions from deadwood are not well understood. We investigated drivers that govern the CO2 and CH4 emission rates of 793 deadwood specimens from 13 different tree species, which were exposed on 27 forest and 38 grassland plots at Schorfheide-Chorin (Germany) for one year. Tree species identity was an important driver for emissions of both gases, whereas habitat type and management intensity were only important for CO2 emission rate. CO2 emission rates were positively linked to mass loss and were one-third higher in forest compared to grassland habitats. The wood traits organic extractives, lignin, and sulfur content were negatively associated with CO2 emission rates, whereas carbon, nitrogen, and magnesium content showed the opposite effect. Among climate variables, air humidity in forest and soil moisture in grassland habitats positively affected CO2 emission rates. CH4 emission rates showed a negative relationship with increasing wood density exposed in both habitat types but were positively related to tree species with higher sulfur contents. Taken together, CO2 emission rates from deadwood were well predicted by wood traits, management intensity and climatic variables, whereas CH4 emission rates were less well predictable and were influenced only by wood traits that differed from those of CO2 emissions. Our results provide a deeper insight into the mineralization processes of deadwood and should be considered in further carbon cycle assessments.
Persistent UFZ Identifier https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=26060
Kipping, L., Gossner, M.M., Koschorreck, M., Muszynski, S., Maurer, F., Weiser, W., Jehmlich, N., Noll, M. (2022):
Emission of CO2 and CH4 from 13 deadwood tree species is linked to tree species identity and management intensity in forest and grassland habitats
Glob. Biogeochem. Cycles 36 (5), e2021GB007143