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Title (Primary) Indoor air pollution effects on pediatric asthma are submicron aerosol particle–dependent
Author Juskiene, I.; Prokopciuk, N.; Franck, U.; Valiulis, A.; Valskys, V.; Mesceriakova, V.; Kvedariene, V.; Valiulyte, I.; Poluzioroviene, E.; Sauliene, I.; Valiulis, A.
Journal European Journal of Pediatrics
Year 2022
Department IMMU
Volume 181
Issue 6
Page From 2469
Page To 2480
Language englisch
Topic T9 Healthy Planet
Keywords Asthma; Indoor aerosol pollution; Particle number concentration; Particle mass concentration; Particle size range; Primary school; Children
Abstract The school environment is crucial for the child’s health and well-being. On the other hand, the data about the role of school’s aerosol pollution on the etiology of chronic non-communicable diseases remain scarce. This study aims to evaluate the level of indoor aerosol pollution in primary schools and its relation to the incidence of doctor’s diagnosed asthma among younger school-age children. The cross-sectional study was carried out in 11 primary schools of Vilnius during 1 year of education from autumn 2017 to spring 2018. Particle number (PNC) and mass (PMC) concentrations in the size range of 0.3–10 µm were measured using an Optical Particle Sizer (OPS, TSI model 3330). The annual incidence of doctor’s diagnosed asthma in each school was calculated retrospectively from the data of medical records. The total number of 6–11 years old children who participated in the study was 3638. The incidence of asthma per school ranged from 1.8 to 6.0%. Mean indoor air pollution based on measurements in classrooms during the lessons was calculated for each school. Levels of PNC and PMC in schools ranged between 33.0 and 168.0 particles/cm3 and 1.7–6.8 µg/m3, respectively. There was a statistically significant correlation between the incidence of asthma and PNC as well as asthma and PMC in the particle size range of 0.3–1 µm (r = 0.66, p = 0.028) and (r = 0.71, p = 0.017) respectively. No significant correlation was found between asthma incidence and indoor air pollution in the particle size range of 0.3–2.5 and 0.3–10 µm.

Conclusion: We concluded that the number and mass concentrations of indoor air aerosol pollution in primary schools in the particle size range of 0.3–1 µm are primarily associated with the incidence of doctor’s diagnosed asthma among younger school-age children.

What is Known:
• Both indoor and outdoor aerosol pollution is associated with bronchial asthma in children.

What is New:
The incidence of bronchial asthma among younger school age children is related to indoor air quality in primary schools.
• Aerosol pollutants in the size range of 0.3–1 µm in contrast to larger size range particles can play major role in the etiology of bronchial asthma in children.
Persistent UFZ Identifier https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=25989
Juskiene, I., Prokopciuk, N., Franck, U., Valiulis, A., Valskys, V., Mesceriakova, V., Kvedariene, V., Valiulyte, I., Poluzioroviene, E., Sauliene, I., Valiulis, A. (2022):
Indoor air pollution effects on pediatric asthma are submicron aerosol particle–dependent
Eur. J. Pediatr. 181 (6), 2469 - 2480