Publication Details

Category Text Publication
Reference Category Journals
DOI 10.1002/iroh.202102089
Licence creative commons licence
Title (Primary) Large wood in river restoration: a case study on the effects on hydromorphology, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning
Author Anlanger, C.; Attermeyer, K.; Hille, S.; Kamjunke, N.; Koll, K.; König, M.; Schnauder, I.; Nogueira Tavares, C.; Weitere, M.; Brauns, M.
Journal International Review of Hydrobiology
Year 2022
Department FLOEK; NSF
Volume 107
Issue 1-2
Page From 34
Page To 45
Language englisch
Topic T5 Future Landscapes
Supplements https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/action/downloadSupplement?doi=10.1002%2Firoh.202102089&file=iroh202102089-sup-0001-REVISIONS2_Anlanger_et_al_WILMU_special_issue_Suppl_final.docx
Keywords community respiration; fish; habitat diversity; macroinvertebrates; microbial biomass
Abstract Large wood (LW) is an integral part of natural river ecosystems and determines their ecological integrity by modulating hydromorphology and providing habitats. Hence, LW installations are a common restoration measure in large rivers, even if effects on biodiversity are ambiguous or unknown for ecosystem functioning. Here we quantified the hydromorphological, biological, and functional effects of LW eight months after installation in a large gravel-bed river. Both morphological and flow diversity increased strongly by 821% and 127%, respectively. Similarly, fish abundance increased nearly tenfold, and macroinvertebrate diversity increased by 35%. Ecosystem functions benefited from LW installation and increased significantly (e.g., by up to 390% for bacterial production) at sites influenced by LW compared to those without LW. Our results highlight the role of the bark habitat of LW that increased the direct effects of LW via the provision of new habitat and stimulated ecosystem-wide processes. Our integrative approach evaluating the success of LW installations in a large river revealed cascading effects from the provisioning of new habitats, the increase of species diversity to higher ecosystem functioning. It also demonstrated that hydromorphological parameters or community composition alone are insufficient to quantify the complex effects of LW installation, which underlines the necessity to evaluate restoration success with different measures.
Persistent UFZ Identifier https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=25582
Anlanger, C., Attermeyer, K., Hille, S., Kamjunke, N., Koll, K., König, M., Schnauder, I., Nogueira Tavares, C., Weitere, M., Brauns, M. (2022):
Large wood in river restoration: a case study on the effects on hydromorphology, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning
Int. Rev. Hydrobiol. 107 (1-2), 34 - 45