Publication Details

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Title (Primary) Filling, remediation and management of pit lakes by using mine water – an update
Title (Secondary) Mine Closure 2018 : Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Mine Closure, 3 – 7 September 2018, Leipzig, Germany
Author Schultze, M.; Jolas, P.; Weber, L.;
Publisher Drebenstedt, C.; von Bismarck, F.; Fourie, A.; Tibbett, M.;
Year 2018
Department SEEFO;
Language englisch;
POF III (all) T31;
Keywords pit lake; mine water; acidification; neutralization; beneficial end use
UFZ inventory Magdeburg, Bibliothek, 00526951, 18-0604 MA Wa 40
Abstract The beneficial reuse of mine water is an important strategy for mining to save regional water recourses. The
use of mine water for filling, remediation and management of pit lakes is one option for such beneficial reuse
of mine water. In the eastern part of Germany, more than 100 pit lakes have to be filled since 1990. The reuse of mine water has considerably contributed to that filling. Since reporting on this issue last time at an IMWA congress in 2011, further experiences have been collected, particularly regarding the sustainability of the strategy.
In this paper, we focus on the southern part of the Central German lignite mining district. An overview on the
pit lakes and their management including filling and remediation is given for this region. Lake Cospuden is
presented in detail as a successful example for experiences from almost 20 years. Other lakes needed lime for neutralization in addition to the use of mine water, partly due to insufficient buffering capacity of the used
mine water. In two cases, the mine water keeps the water level stabile although the lakes are located in the
groundwater depression cone of a neighbouring, operating mine.
Based on those examples, we discuss the advantages and limitations of the strategy. The main advantages
are that the mine water remains in the region and that the use of mine water provides an additional water
resource for rapid filling of pit lakes resulting in a stabilization of the sidewalls of the pit and, thus, lowering
the needed effort for safety. A further advantage is caused by the relatively high concentrations of iron
acceptable for the filling water for pit lakes lowering the needed effort for mine water treatment. Neutral
mine water also contributes considerably to the neutralization of the rising pit lakes. The main limitation is
that pit lakes need to be located close to operating mines. Although that is the case not very often, mine water has been used for filling, remediation and management of pit lakes not only in Germany but also in Poland. A second limitation is the water quality of the mine water. Usually, only neutral mine water having limited metal concentration is suitable for filling, remediation and management of pit lakes.
ID 20872
Persistent UFZ Identifier http://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=20872
Schultze, M., Jolas, P., Weber, L. (2018):
Filling, remediation and management of pit lakes by using mine water – an update
In: Drebenstedt, C., von Bismarck, F., Fourie, A., Tibbett, M. (eds.)
Mine Closure 2018 : Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Mine Closure, 3 – 7 September 2018, Leipzig, Germany
TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg, p. 495 - 502