Publication Details

Reference Category Journals
DOI / URL link
Title (Primary) Cultivation-independent analysis reveals a shift in ciliate 18S rRNA gene diversity in a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-polluted soil
Author Lara, E.; Berney, C.; Harms, H.; Chatzinotas, A.;
Journal FEMS Microbiology Ecology
Year 2007
Department UMB;
Volume 62
Issue 3
Language englisch;
Abstract Using cultivation-independent methods the ciliate communities of a clay-rich soil with a 90-year record of pollution by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (4.5 g kg-1 PAH) were compared with that of a nonpolluted soil collected in its vicinity and with similar properties. A ciliate-specific set of 18S rRNA gene targeting primers was designed and used to amplify DNA extracted from both soils (surface and 20 cm depth). Four clone libraries were generated with PCR products that covered an 18S rRNA gene fragment of up to 670 bp. Comparative sequence analysis of representative clones proved that the primer set was highly specific for ciliates. Calculation of similarity indices based on operational taxonomic units after amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis of the clones showed that the community from the nonpolluted surface soil was highly dissimilar to the other communities. The presence of several taxa, namely sequences affiliated to the orders Phyllopharyngia, Haptoria, Nassophorea, Peniculida and Scuticociliatia in samples from nonpolluted soil, points to the existence of various trophic functional groups. In contrast, the 18S rRNA gene diversity was much lower in the clone libraries from the polluted soil. More than 90% of these sequences belonged to the class Colpodea, a well-known clade of mainly bacterivorous and r-selected species, thus potentially also indicating a lower functional diversity.
ID 1989
Persistent UFZ Identifier https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=1989
Lara, E., Berney, C., Harms, H., Chatzinotas, A. (2007):
Cultivation-independent analysis reveals a shift in ciliate 18S rRNA gene diversity in a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-polluted soil
FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 62 (3), 365 - 373