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Title (Primary) Deforestation fosters bacterial diversity and the cyanobacterial community responsible for carbon fixation processes under semiarid climate: a metaproteomics study
Author Bastida, F.; García, C.; von Bergen, M.; Moreno, J.L.; Richnow, H.H.; Jehmlich, N.;
Journal Applied Soil Ecology
Year 2015
Department ISOBIO; PROTEOM;
Volume 93
Language englisch;
POF III (all) T41;
Keywords Deforestation; Microbial community; Metaproteomics; Biomass
UFZ wide themes RU3;
Abstract The long-term effects of deforestation on the soil microbial community and its functionality are largely unknown. In order to assess simultaneously the phylogeny and functionality, we applied phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFAs), metaproteomics and enzyme activities in soil samples from a natural area located in Southeast Spain (Caravaca de la Cruz), dominated by Pinus halepensis (F), and an adjacent area deforested 15-years ago (DF). Deforestation induced a long-term loss of bacterial biomass and enzyme activity, but an increase in the bacterial diversity as estimated by metaproteomics. Protein abundances analysis revealed that Proteobacteria was higher in F than DF. In addition, the abundance of cyanobacterial proteins was significantly higher in DF (7.3%) when compared to F (0.9%). Interestingly, cyanobacterial proteins involved in carbon fixation (Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, phycocyanins and photosystem proteins) were only identified in DF. The data suggest that Cyanobacteria play a critical role in the ecosystem functioning and biotic carbon fixation when soil is deforested in semiarid areas.
ID 16253
Persistent UFZ Identifier http://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=16253
Bastida, F., García, C., von Bergen, M., Moreno, J.L., Richnow, H.H., Jehmlich, N. (2015):
Deforestation fosters bacterial diversity and the cyanobacterial community responsible for carbon fixation processes under semiarid climate: a metaproteomics study
Appl. Soil Ecol. 93 , 65 - 67