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Title (Primary) Relevance of deep-subsurface microbiology for underground gas storage and geothermal energy production
Title (Secondary) Geobiotechnology II: Energy resources, subsurface technologies, organic pollutants and mining legal principles
Author Gniese, C.; Bombach, P.; Rakoczy, J.; Hoth, N.; Schlömann, M.; Richnow, H.-H.; Krüger, M.;
Publisher Schippers, A.; Glombitza, F.; Sand, W.;
Journal Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology
Year 2014
Department ISOBIO;
Volume 142
Language englisch;
POF III (all) T15;
Keywords CCS; Deep biosphere; Geothermal energy; Hydrocarbon reservoir; Renewable energy; Underground gas storage
UFZ wide themes RU4;
Abstract This chapter gives the reader an introduction into the microbiology of deep geological systems with a special focus on potential geobiotechnological applications and respective risk assessments. It has been known for decades that microbial activity is responsible for the degradation or conversion of hydrocarbons in oil, gas, and coal reservoirs. These processes occur in the absence of oxygen, a typical characteristic of such deep ecosystems. The understanding of the responsible microbial processes and their environmental regulation is not only of great scientific interest. It also has substantial economic and social relevance, inasmuch as these processes directly or indirectly affect the quantity and quality of the stored oil or gas. As outlined in the following chapter, in addition to the conventional hydrocarbons, new interest in such deep subsurface systems is rising for different technological developments. These are introduced together with related geomicrobiological topics. The capture and long-term storage of large amounts of carbon dioxide, carbon capture and storage (CCS), for example, in depleted oil and gas reservoirs, is considered to be an important option to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and global warming. On the other hand, the increasing contribution of energy from natural and renewable sources, such as wind, solar, geothermal energy, or biogas production leads to an increasing interest in underground storage of renewable energies. Energy carriers, that is, biogas, methane, or hydrogen, are often produced in a nonconstant manner and renewable energy may be produced at some distance from the place where it is needed. Therefore, storing the energy after its conversion to methane or hydrogen in porous reservoirs or salt caverns is extensively discussed. All these developments create new research fields and challenges for microbiologists and geobiotechnologists. As a basis for respective future work, we introduce the three major topics, that is, CCS, underground storage of gases from renewable energy production, and the production of geothermal energy, and summarize the current state of knowledge about related geomicrobiological and geobiotechnological aspects in this chapter. Finally, recommendations are made for future research.
ID 15287
Persistent UFZ Identifier https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=15287
Gniese, C., Bombach, P., Rakoczy, J., Hoth, N., Schlömann, M., Richnow, H.-H., Krüger, M. (2014):
Relevance of deep-subsurface microbiology for underground gas storage and geothermal energy production
In: Schippers, A., Glombitza, F., Sand, W. (eds.)
Geobiotechnology II: Energy resources, subsurface technologies, organic pollutants and mining legal principles
Adv. Biochem. Eng. Biotechnol. 142
Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, p. 95 - 121