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Reference Category Book chapters
DOI / URL link
Title (Primary) Integrating short- and long-range processes into models: the emergence of pattern
Title (Secondary) Patterns of land degradation in drylands: understanding self-organised ecogeomorphic systems
Author Caylor, K.K.; Okin, G.S.; Turnbull, L.; Wainwright, J.; Wiegand, T.; Franz, T.E.; Parsons, A.J.;
Publisher Mueller, E.N.; Wainwright, J.; Parsons, A.J.; Turnbull, L.;
Year 2014
Department OESA;
Language englisch;
POF III (all) T53;
UFZ wide themes RU5;
UFZ inventory Halle - Biozönose, Bibliothek, 00484558, 14-0119
Abstract The production of pattern requires feedbacks operating on different spatial and/or temporal scales and thus the integration of short- and long-range processes. More flexible models – ones able to represent the dynamics of change over more than just spatiotemporal snapshots – must be able to reconfigure their state and process representations. Scale and process are critically linked when considering the state and function of dryland ecosystems: different processes dominate at different scales. There are four scales at which land degradation in drylands is typically considered: plant-interspace, patch, landscape and region. However, cross-scale process interactions are a critical element of modelling dryland degradation. There are intimate relationships between scale, process and pattern in drylands and many of these relationships involve cross-scale interactions. One possible consequence of these cross-scale interactions is the manifestation of bistability, which may also be present at different scales. A key issue for modelling is the mismatch between temporal scales of processes, which are typically short term, and degradation scales, which are typically long term, and the feedbacks that exist between these two sets of scales. To add to this complexity, ecological, biogeochemical and geomorphological fluxes redistribute energy and materials either vertically, or horizontally, or both. Interactions between these lateral and vertical fluxes are intrinsic to ecosystem dynamics and pattern formation in drylands. In all modelling, the important challenge remains of how to strike the balance between the technical details of a particular system and the strategic simplifications necessary to maintain generality, and to employ appropriate strategies that will permit generalization from specific case studies.
ID 15113
Persistent UFZ Identifier https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=15113
Caylor, K.K., Okin, G.S., Turnbull, L., Wainwright, J., Wiegand, T., Franz, T.E., Parsons, A.J. (2014):
Integrating short- and long-range processes into models: the emergence of pattern
In: Mueller, E.N., Wainwright, J., Parsons, A.J., Turnbull, L. (eds.)
Patterns of land degradation in drylands: understanding self-organised ecogeomorphic systems
Springer, Utrecht, p. 141 - 167