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Title (Primary) Microbial degradation of the pharmaceutical ibuprofen and the herbicide 2,4-D in water and soil - use and limits of data obtained from aqueous systems for predicting their fate in soil
Author Girardi, C.; Nowak, K.M.; Carranza-Diaz, O.; Lewkow, B.; Miltner, A.; Gehre, M.; Schäffer, A.; Kästner, M.;
Journal Science of the Total Environment
Year 2013
Department ISOBIO; UBT; ANA; GWS;
Volume 444
Language englisch;
POF III (all) T41;
Keywords Biodegradation rates; Mineralisation; Risk assessment of chemicals; Non-extractable residues; Labelled compounds; OECD tests 301, 307
UFZ wide themes ru3
Abstract

The persistence of chemicals is a key parameter for their environmental risk assessment. Extrapolating their biodegradability potential in aqueous systems to soil systems would improve the environmental impact assessment. This study compares the fate of 14/13C-labelled 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) and ibuprofen in OECD tests 301 (ready biodegradability in aqueous systems) and 307 (soil). 85% of 2,4-D and 68% of ibuprofen were mineralised in aqueous systems, indicating ready biodegradability, but only 57% and 45% in soil. Parent compounds and metabolites decreased to < 2% of the spiked amounts in both systems. In soil, 36% of 2,4-D and 30% of ibuprofen were bound in non-extractable residues (NER). NER formation in the abiotic controls was half as high as in the biotic treatments. However, mineralisation, biodegradation and abiotic residue formation are competing processes. Assuming the same extent of abiotic NER formation in abiotic and biotic systems may therefore overestimate the abiotic contribution in the biotic systems. Mineralisation was described by a logistic model for the aquatic systems and by a two-pool first order degradation model for the soil systems. This agrees with the different abundance of microorganisms in the two systems, but precludes direct comparison of the fitted parameters. Nevertheless, the maximum mineralisable amounts determined by the models were similar in both systems, although the maximum mineralisation rate was about 3.5 times higher in the aqueous systems than in the soil system for both compounds; these parameters may thus be extrapolated from aqueous to soil systems. However, the maximum mineralisable amount is calculated by extrapolation to infinite times and includes intermediately formed biomass derived from the labelled carbon. The amount of labelled carbon within microbial biomass residues is higher in the soil system, resulting in lower degradation rates. Further evaluation of these relationships requires comparison data on more chemicals and from different soils.


ID 13065
Persistent UFZ Identifier http://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=13065
Girardi, C., Nowak, K.M., Carranza-Diaz, O., Lewkow, B., Miltner, A., Gehre, M., Schäffer, A., Kästner, M. (2013):
Microbial degradation of the pharmaceutical ibuprofen and the herbicide 2,4-D in water and soil - use and limits of data obtained from aqueous systems for predicting their fate in soil
Sci. Total Environ. 444 , 32 - 42