Details zur Publikation

Referenztyp Buchkapitel
DOI / URL
Titel (primär) Assessing contaminant attenuation under temporally variable groundwater flow conditions
Titel (sekundär) Groundwater quality: securing groundwater quality in urban and industrial environments
Autor Beyer, C.; Khan, F.; Rein, A.; Dietrich, P.; Kolditz, O.; Bauer, S.;
Herausgeber Trefry, M.G.;
Journal / Serie IAHS Publication
Erscheinungsjahr 2008
Department ENVINF; MET;
Band/Volume 324
Sprache englisch;
Keywords transient groundwater flow; biodegradation; site assessment; uncertainty; modelling
Abstract

Transient groundwater flow may severely hamper the monitoring and evaluation of natural attenuation
processes at contaminated sites, as concentration distributions derived from point measurements at monitoring
wells may neither be temporally nor spatially representative. This problem is studied using numerical modelling
of transient flow and reactive contaminant transport within synthetic aquifers. Uncertainties in site investigation
due to transient flow are assessed by simulating plume sampling: concentration measurements at control planes
in different spatial configurations are used to characterize the plumes and attenuation processes. It is found that
local concentration measurements may be significantly influenced by transient flow conditions. Control planes
with insufficient spatial well density involve the risk of missing the plume centre and temporal concentration
peaks. Transient flow conditions may thus be a strong source of uncertainty for the assessment of contaminant
attenuation based on local measurements in space and time.

ID 806
dauerhafte UFZ-Verlinkung https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=806
Beyer, C., Khan, F., Rein, A., Dietrich, P., Kolditz, O., Bauer, S. (2008):
Assessing contaminant attenuation under temporally variable groundwater flow conditions
In: Trefry, M.G. (ed.)
Groundwater quality: securing groundwater quality in urban and industrial environments
IAHS Publ. 324
International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS), Wallingford, Oxfordshire, p. 210 - 217