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Titel (primär) Clumped versus scattered: how does the spatial correlation of disturbance events affect biodiversity?
Autor Banitz, T.; Huth, A.; Grimm, V.; Johst, K.;
Journal / Serie Theoretical Ecology
Erscheinungsjahr 2008
Department OESA;
Band/Volume 1
Heft 4
Sprache englisch;
Keywords Coexistence; Disturbance; Competition-colonisation trade-off; Life history traits; Intermediate disturbance hypothesis
Abstract In this study, we systematically explore the effects of rate and spatial correlation (level of clumping) of disturbance events on a community of sessile species differing in their life history traits. A spatially explicit individual-based model shows that long-term coexistence is very sensitive to spatial correlation when the trade-off in life history traits includes differences in dispersal distances. Highest biodiversity emerges at highly correlated disturbances of intermediate rates. Diversity peaks shift to larger rates when clumping decreases. Scattered disturbances lead to competitive exclusion. Interestingly, we observed additional peaks in the diversity-disturbance curves at certain levels of clumping. Thus, subject to the differences in life history traits, particular combinations of disturbance rate and spatial correlation may enable subsets of species to coexist, which opens new possibilities for explaining diversity. Our results suggest that observation of high biodiversity under spatially correlated disturbances points to a competition-colonisation trade-off, which includes dispersal distances.
ID 762
dauerhafte UFZ-Verlinkung https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=762
Banitz, T., Huth, A., Grimm, V., Johst, K. (2008):
Clumped versus scattered: how does the spatial correlation of disturbance events affect biodiversity?
Theor. Ecol. 1 (4), 231 - 240