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Details zur Publikation

Referenztyp Zeitschriften
DOI / URL Link
Titel (primär) Mechanistically-derived dispersal kernels explain species-level patterns of recruitment and succession
Autor Sullivan, L.L.; Clark, A.T.; Tilman, D.; Shaw, A.K.;
Journal / Serie Ecology
Erscheinungsjahr 2018
Department iDiv; PHYDIV;
Band/Volume 99
Heft 11
Sprache englisch;
POF III (gesamt) T11;
Supplements https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/action/downloadSupplement?doi=10.1002%2Fecy.2498&file=ecy2498-sup-0001-DataS1.zip
https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/action/downloadSupplement?doi=10.1002%2Fecy.2498&file=ecy2498-sup-0002-AppendixS1.pdf
https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/action/downloadSupplement?doi=10.1002%2Fecy.2498&file=ecy2498-sup-0003-AppendixS2.pdf
https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/action/downloadSupplement?doi=10.1002%2Fecy.2498&file=ecy2498-sup-0004-MetadataS1.pdf
Keywords colonization; competition; dispersal; establishment; propagule pressure; seed traits; spatial ecology; succession; terminal velocity; WALD model
Abstract Species‐level dispersal information can give mechanistic insights into how spatial processes impact plant communities. Unfortunately, field‐based estimates of the dispersal abilities of multiple members of a community are often lacking for many plant systems. Here, we provide a simple method for measuring dispersal ability for large numbers of grassland plant species based on functional traits. Using this method, we estimated the dispersal ability of 50 co‐occurring grassland species using the Wald Analytical Long‐distance Dispersal (WALD) model. Grassland plants species are often used for developing community theory, yet species‐level estimates of their dispersal abilities are comparatively rare. We use these dispersal measurements to examine the relationship between species dispersal abilities and successional dynamics using data from a 90‐yr old field chronosequence. We find that our estimated dispersal measurements matched field‐based establishment observations well, and estimated species colonization, competitive, and establishment abilities. We hope that this method for measuring dispersal ability of multiple species within a community, and its demonstrated ability to generate predictions for spatial ecology, will encourage more studies of the explicit role of dispersal in plant community ecology.
ID 21144
dauerhafte UFZ-Verlinkung https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=21144
Sullivan, L.L., Clark, A.T., Tilman, D., Shaw, A.K. (2018):
Mechanistically-derived dispersal kernels explain species-level patterns of recruitment and succession
Ecology 99 (11), 2415 - 2420