Details zur Publikation

Referenztyp Zeitschriften
DOI / URL Link
Titel (primär) Soil viral communities vary temporally and along a land use transect as revealed by virus-like particle counting and a modified community fingerprinting approach (fRAPD)
Autor Narr, A.; Nawaz, A.; Wick, L.Y.; Harms, H.; Chatzinotas, A.;
Journal / Serie Frontiers in Microbiology
Erscheinungsjahr 2017
Department UMB; BOOEK; iDiv;
Band/Volume 8
Sprache englisch;
POF III (gesamt) T41;
Supplements https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2017.01975/full#supplementary-material
Keywords time-series analysis; virus, Phage; community dynamics; Virus-like particles; VLP; RAPD; Soil
UFZ Querschnittsthemen RU1
Abstract Environmental surveys on soil viruses are still rare and mostly anecdotal, i.e. they mostly report on viruses at one location or for only a few sampling dates. Detailed time-series analysis with multiple samples can reveal the spatio-temporal dynamics of viral communities and provide important input as to how viruses interact with their potential hosts and the environment. Such surveys, however, require fast, easy-to-apply and reliable methods. In the present study we surveyed monthly across 13 months the abundance of virus-like particles (VLP) and the structure of the viral communities in soils along a land use transect (i.e. forest, pasture and cropland). We evaluated 32 procedures to extract VLP from soil using different buffers and mechanical methods. The most efficient extraction was achieved with 1 × saline magnesium buffer in combination with 20 min vortexing. For community structure analysis we developed an optimized fingerprinting approach (fluorescent RAPD-PCR; fRAPD) by combining RAPD-PCR with fluorescently labeled primers in order to size the obtained fragments on a capillary sequencing machine. With the concomitantly collected data of soil specific factors and weather data, we were able to find correlations of viral abundance and community structure with environmental variables and sampling site. More specifically, we found that soil specific factors such as pH and total nitrogen content played a significant role in shaping both soil viral abundance and community structure. The fRAPD analysis revealed high temporal changes and clustered the viral communities according to sampling sites. In particular Wwe observed that in particular temperature and rain fall) shaped soil viral communities in non-forest sites. In summary our findings suggest that sampling site was a key factor for shaping the abundance and community structure of soil viruses, and when site vegetation was reduced, temperature and rain fall were also important factors.
ID 19260
dauerhafte UFZ-Verlinkung http://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=19260
Narr, A., Nawaz, A., Wick, L.Y., Harms, H., Chatzinotas, A. (2017):
Soil viral communities vary temporally and along a land use transect as revealed by virus-like particle counting and a modified community fingerprinting approach (fRAPD)
Front. Microbiol. 8 , art. 1975