Details zur Publikation

Referenztyp Zeitschriften
DOI / URL Link
Titel (primär) Associations between air temperature and cardio-respiratory mortality in the urban area of Beijing, China: a time-series analysis
Autor Liu, L.; Breitner, S.; Pan, X.; Franck, U.; Leitte, A.M.; Wiedensohler, A.; von Klot, S.; Wichmann, H.-E.; Peters, A.; Schneider, A.;
Journal / Serie Environmental Health
Erscheinungsjahr 2011
Department STUDIEN;
Band/Volume 10
Heft May
Sprache englisch;
Abstract

Background

Associations between air temperature and mortality have been consistently observed in Europe and the United States; however, there is a lack of studies for Asian countries. Our study investigated the association between air temperature and cardio-respiratory mortality in the urban area of Beijing, China.

Methods

Death counts for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases for adult residents ([greater than or equal to]15 years), meteorological parameters and concentrations of particulate air pollution were obtained from January 2003 to August 2005. The effects of two-day and 15-day average temperatures were estimated by Poisson regression models, controlling for time trend, relative humidity and other confounders if necessary. Effects were explored for warm (April to September) and cold periods (October to March) separately. The lagged effects of daily temperature were investigated by polynomial distributed lag (PDL) models.

Results

We observed a J-shaped exposure-response function only for 15-day average temperature and respiratory mortality in the warm period, with 21.3degreesC as the threshold temperature. All other exposure-response functions could be considered as linear. In the warm period, a 5degreesC increase of two-day average temperature was associated with a RR of 1.098 (95% confidence interval (95%CI): 1.057-1.140) for cardiovascular and 1.134 (95%CI: 1.050-1.224) for respiratory mortality; a 5degreesC decrease of 15-day average temperature was associated with a RR of 1.040 (95%CI: 0.990-1.093) for cardiovascular mortality. In the cold period, a 5degreesC increase of two-day average temperature was associated with a RR of 1.149 (95%CI: 1.078-1.224) for respiratory mortality; a 5degreesC decrease of 15-day average temperature was associated with a RR of 1.057 (95%CI: 1.022-1.094) for cardiovascular mortality. The effects remained robust after considering particles as additional confounders.

Conclusions

Both increases and decreases in air temperature are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. The effects of heat were immediate while the ones of cold became predominant with longer time lags. Increases in air temperature are also associated with an immediate increased risk of respiratory mortality.

ID 11154
dauerhafte UFZ-Verlinkung https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=11154
Liu, L., Breitner, S., Pan, X., Franck, U., Leitte, A.M., Wiedensohler, A., von Klot, S., Wichmann, H.-E., Peters, A., Schneider, A. (2011):
Associations between air temperature and cardio-respiratory mortality in the urban area of Beijing, China: a time-series analysis
Environ. Health 10 (May ), 51