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Details zur Publikation

Referenztyp Zeitschriften
DOI / URL Link
Titel (primär) Palatability and tolerance to simulated herbivory in native and introduced populations of Alliaria petiolata (Brassicaceae)
Autor Boßdorf, O.; Schröder, S.; Prati, D.; Auge, H.;
Journal / Serie American Journal of Botany
Erscheinungsjahr 2004
Department BZF;
Band/Volume 91
Heft 16
Sprache englisch;
Keywords biological invasionsCeutorhynchus scrobicollis; compensatory regrowth;EICA hypothesis;microevolution;plant– herbivore interactions;plant resistance;Spodoptera littoralis
Abstract

The European herb garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) is a serious invader of North American deciduous forests. One explanation for its success could be that in the absence of specialized herbivores, selection has favored less defended but more vigorous genotypes. This idea was addressed by comparing offspring from several native and introduced Alliaria populations with respect to their palatability to insect herbivores and their tolerance to simulated herbivory. Feeding rates of a specialist weevil from the native range were significantly greater on American plants, suggesting a loss of resistance in the introduced range. In contrast, there was significant population variation but no continent effect in the feeding rates of a generalist caterpillar. After simulated herbivory, A. petiolata showed a substantial regrowth capacity that involved changes in plant growth, architecture, and allocation. Removal of 75% leaf area or of all bolting stems reduced plant fitness to 81% and 58%, respectively, of the fitness of controls. There was no indication of a difference in tolerance between native and introduced Alliaria populations or of a trade-off between tolerance and resistance.

ID 3999
dauerhafte UFZ-Verlinkung https://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=20939&ufzPublicationIdentifier=3999
Boßdorf, O., Schröder, S., Prati, D., Auge, H. (2004):
Palatability and tolerance to simulated herbivory in native and introduced populations of Alliaria petiolata (Brassicaceae)
Am. J. Bot. 91 (16), 856 - 862