Dr. rer. nat. Falk Heße

Contact

Dr. rer. nat. Falk Heße

Department Computational Hydrosystems
Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Sciences
Permoserstr. 15
04318 Leipzig, Germany

Tel: 0341 235 1050

falk.hesse@ufz.de

Persönliche Bild

Scientific Career

 since 2015

Postdoctoral Researcher at Helmholtzcentre for Environmental Science - UFZ, Department for Hydrosystems

 2014

Visiting Scholar at the University of California at Berkeley, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

 2012-2013

Postdoctoral Researcher at Helmholtzcentre for Environmental Science - UFZ, Department for Environmental Microbiology

 2009-2012

Postdoctoral Researcher at the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Institute of Geosciences, Department of Hydrogeology

 2006-2009

PhD Student at the Helmholtzcentre for Environmental Science - UFZ, Department for Computational Hydrosystems

2003-2005

Master Student of Computational Sciences at the Technical University Chemnitz, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of Theoretical Physics

1999 - 2003

Diploma Student of Physical Engineering at the University of Applied Sciences Jena, Department SciTec Precision - Optics - Materials - Environment


Research interests

Multiscale Models, Numerics of Dynamical Systems, Stochastic Processes


Topics

AquaDiva

The collaborated research centre (Sonderforschungsbereich) AquaDiva is dedicated to the investigation of how surface conditions and geology influence the functional biodiversity of the subsurface. Within this centre we are tasked with modelling the water and energy movement through the subsurface.

To that end, I apply the mesocsale Hydrological Model mHM, a spatially distributed hydrological model to the catchment of the AquaDiva observation site. Using detailed data of precipitation, land cover, morphology and soil type as inputs, mHM can determine fluxes like recharge and evapotranspiration and states like soil moisture as outputs.

Using these data, I apply the analytical framework developed by Botter et al. [2010, WRR] and Van der Velde et al. [2012, WRR] to quantify how the catchment stores and releases water. This allows for a description of the flow and transport dynamics taking place in the catchment. The spatial distribution of such dynamics can then be compared with land cover and soil moisture maps as well as driving forces like precipitation and temperature. Additionally I can determine the temporal evolution of mean travel times by using time series of all relevant hydrological processes from 1960-2010.

Teaching

Computational Fluid Dynamics: Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Sciences, International Master of Water Engineering

Mathematics and Modelling: Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Sciences, Master of Water Engineering

Modelling Flow and Transport in the Subsurface: Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Sciences, Master of Water Engineering