Research for the Environment

Main themes and working groups

Department Conservation Biology, Arbeitsgebiete

The Department of Conservation Biology comprises three Working Groups (WG), each focusing on different but complementary research fields. The broad range of functional responsibility provides us with flexibility and responsiveness, necessary to provide timely solutions to a diversity of conservation issues.

The WG Floodplain Ecology focuses on developing and improving bio-indication systems and addresses the relationships between flooding regimes, site condition, landscape structures, and biodiversity in floodplain ecosystems.
The WG Theory & Science-Policy Interfaces acts to understand the interrelations between science, society, and policy/politics and in parallel collates, edits, and communicates scientific knowledge to society and policy-makers/politics.
The WG Population Ecology and Landscape Structures focuses on analyzing the effects of habitat loss, fragmentation and climate changes on population processes and biodiversity and develops conservation concepts and tools for species-conservation.

All Working Groups place high value on networking and seek to enhance cooperation with other research groups throughout the world.

For motivated and dedicated students and advanced scientists who are interested in our work, we offer various opportunities to participate in our research via internship, academic theses, and research visits.

Recent Publications

JAX, K. (Ed.)(2010): Ecosystem functioning Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, 272 S.

Fisheries and Fish-eating Vertebrates as a Model Case
Series: Environmental Science and Engineering
Subseries: Environmental Science
Klenke, R.A.; Ring, I.; Kranz, A.; Jepsen, N.; Rauschmayer, F.; Henle, K. (Eds.)
2013, XIV, 347 p. 64 illus., 36 in color.

JAX. K. & A. SCHWARZ (2011): Competing terms. Chapter 11,. In: SCHWARZ, A. & K. JAX (eds.): Ecology Revisited: Reflecting on Concepts, Advancing Science. Dordrecht, Springer: 155-159.

SCHWARZ, A. & K. JAX (eds.): Ecology Revisited: Reflecting on Concepts, Advancing Science. Dordrecht, Springer: 444 p.

BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION Volume 20, Number 5, 1057-1072, DOI: 10.1007/s10531-011-0015-2

Effects of species turnover on reserve site selection in a fragmented landscape - Birgit Felinks, Renata Pardini, Marianna Dixo, Klaus Follner, Jean P. Metzger und Klaus Henle

BRECKLING, B., PE'ER, G. & Y.G. MATSINOS (2011). Cellular Automata in Ecological Modelling. In: JOPP, F., REUTER, H., BRECKLING, B. (Eds.): Modelling Complex Ecological Dynamics.  Springer: 105-117.

BRECKLING, B., PE'ER, G. & Y.G. MATSINOS (2011). Cellular Automata in Ecological Modelling. In: JOPP, F., REUTER, H., BRECKLING, B. (Eds.): Modelling Complex Ecological Dynamics. Springer: 105-117.

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/331/6021/1139.summary

Science-Policy Interface: Beyond Assessments - Mike Hulme, Martin Mahony, Silke Beck, Christoph Görg, Bernd Hansjürgens, Jennifer Hauck, Carsten Nesshöver, Axel Paulsch, Marie Vandewalle, Heidi Wittmer, Stefan Böschen, Peter Bridgewater, Mariteuw Chimère Diaw, Pierre Fabre, Aurelia Figueroa, Kong Luen Heong, Horst Korn, Rik Leemans, Eva Lövbrand, Mohd Norowi Hamid, Chad Monfreda, Roger Pielke, Jr., Josef Settele, Marten Winter, Alice B. M. Vadrot, Sybille van den Hove and Jeroen P. van der Sluijs, Science 5 August 2011: 697-698.