CITE seminar series

CITE - Chemicals In the Environment - is a research topic within the Helmholtz programm oriented funding. CITE addresses multiple aspects of the impact of chemicals in the environment. The seminar series (irregular) with invited external speakers aims to reflect these different aspects.

Scheduled seminars


Date: 22.5.2014 (Thu), 3 p.m.

Presenter: Dr. Daniel Stalter

National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox) at the University of Queensland in Australia.

Title: Disinfection by-products in drinking water – catching the polar, the volatiles and the unknowns for a comprehensive bioanalytical water quality assessment

Abstract: While drinking water disinfection is one of the major public health advances in the last century, one downside is that the disinfectants also react with organic and inorganic precursors to form potentially hazardous disinfection by-products (DBPs). After 35 years of research the major fraction of formed DBPs are not yet identified and hence, the bioanalytical evaluation of drinking water toxicity is a crucial complement to chemical analysis to evaluate drinking water quality. However, the high enrichment factors commonly required for bioanalytical assessment entail the loss of a significant fraction of volatile and polar DBPs. Here we explored different enrichment methods with the aim to minimise the loss of DBPs. For the toxicological characterisation of the volatile fraction of total DBPs we adapted bioassays to minimise the loss of volatile DBPs during dosing and exposure to the samples. Finally, we evaluated drinking water samples using chemical analysis and bioassays. All detected DBPs have been toxicologically characterised as single compounds and in the mixtures in ratios found in the water samples to evaluate the toxicological relevance of the known DBPs compared to the unknown fraction.

Biosketch: Daniel Stalter studied biology at the Goethe University in Frankfurt. One of his research interests is in the ecotoxicological effect assessment of wastewater. Daniel’s current post-doctoral research at the National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox) at the University of Queensland (Australia) focuses on drinking water treatment and the bioanalytical toxicity assessment of disinfection by-products (DBPs).

Host: Beate Escher (Zelltox)

       

Date: 20.5.2014 (Tue), 3 p.m., Building 6, Room 111

Presenter: Dr. Peta Neale

National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox) at the University of Queensland in Australia.

Title: Toxic tattoos? Bioanalytical evidence that tattoo ink can induce oxidative stress and genotoxicity

            
Abstract: Tattooing has become increasingly popular, particularly among young people. Previous studies have shown that tattoo inks can contain hazardous chemicals, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), but little is known about the potential health risks posed by tattoo inks. In this seminar I will present our recent work on using cell-based bioanalytical tools to assess the toxicological hazard of tattoo inks. Bioanalytical tools relevant to human health including oxidative stress and genotoxicity were applied to a range of tattoo ink extracts. Chemical analysis was utilized to determine how much of the observed effect could be related to known chemicals. Finally, a tattoo bioanalytical equivalent measure was established, which may be used to compare chemical exposure from tattoos to other sources of exposure.

Biosketch: Peta Neale is an environmental scientist and the central theme of her research is to understand the fate and effect of chemicals. She is a research fellow at the National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox) at the University of Queensland in Australia. She has a PhD in Environmental Engineering from the University of Edinburgh, UK.

Host: Beate Escher (ZELLTOX)




     

Kontakt

Dr. Stefan Scholz
Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, UFZ
stefan.scholz@ufz.de
Tel.: 0341 235 1080